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rocking san francisco city hall indian way. how about a big round of applause for all our dancers? all right. [applause] all right. once again let's hear it for your singers, our dancers from everywhere here in the san francisco bay area. [applause] all right. good singing. good dancing. posting the eagle staff at this time. be shout out to larry harrison for taking care of our eagle staff. you maybe seated. calling up to the podium at this time michael lupdtin and vice president of the marketing and branding for this station. >> hi everyone. can you hear me? hello everyone. i am from kqmd and i wanted to welcome you to this eighth annual indian heritage celebration. we are honored to be honoring four heroes from the community who have tirelessly worked throughout the year to provide the kind of service that admissible media is about and engaged community and robust heritage is about. nominated by community leaders they have worked at the grass-roots level and share the highest values we all share. as a public supported media organization we are committed to this and in no
indian alliance. it was created in the 90's to provide voice to the community in santa clara valley and started by laverne robert and provides two annual powwows and numerous fundraisers. gwen has been part of the alliance for about 15 years now. gwen is a elder and retired from the american indian district titles four, seven and nine of the indian education act. she has moved beyond the limits of her duties for the families in her district. she spends time volunteers for all community functions that the alliance puts on. the families that she serves remember her fondly and all that she did for them. she offered her talents to powwows, food booths, graduations and dinners and let's watch a video on gwen stirrer. >> i am [inaudible] known as the keepers of the western door. they're on the western side of new york and they're the biggest of the tribes. i'm the one -- i'm the one that creeks that runs through our reservation now. indian community -- there was nothing in the beginning. for 20 years that i work in the school district helping the children understand that their her
of her injuries. it is about indian attitudes towards women, but they also look at how it runs itself. many are accused of rape, murder, and other serious crimes. andrew north reports. >> it was an eruption that many believe was waiting to happen. the new delhi rape case has unleashed a torrent of anger at the old order, bringing a darker side of that democracy to light. the government is promising speedier trials and tougher laws. the suspected criminals this activist is investigating, he says the politicians are evading justice. >> our judicial system, it takes such a long time. they have been in the seat of power, where they can delay cases not just for years, but for decades. >> we have come to the indian heartland. it is one of the engines of indian politics, controlling the most number of seats in parliament. down the line from delhi, there is this small town. the name means "jewel," and here, this man is king. he is a minister in the state government. but he has also been charged with a gang rape. six years later, there has been no prosecution or movement in his case. we find h
and exchange commission. during his annual state of the indian nations address today, jefferson keel asks that the government to set the federal tribes and the sequestration budget cuts to the to go into effect next month. a call on the us house to authorize the violence against women act and for congress to cut pass comprehensive immigration reform. this is an hour, 15 minutes. >> good morning. i am the executive director of the national congress of american indians. the oldest and largest native american advocacy organization representing indian country and alaska natives and dentists, tribal governments, and their communities. i am pleased to welcome our distinguished guests here in washington, and those listening around the country, because that 2013 state of indian nations. across the country, students, teachers, and travel citizens and leaders, businesses have gathered to watch this event together. among those many events, we're likely to be joined by students from the laguna middle school, the boys and girls clubs of the greater scottsdale, and tribes, muskogee creek nation, confed
came at the annual seeded andean nations address at the museum in washington d.c. senate indian affairs committee chairman maria cantwell spoke at the event. it's an hour and 15 minutes. >> good morning. i am avalon dawson, executive director of the national congress of american indians. the oldest and largest native american advocacy organization representing indian country alaska natives and interests of the tribal government and communities. i am also pleased to welcome our distinguished guests in washington d.c. and those listening around the country to the 2013 state of andean nations. across the country, students, teachers, businesses have gathered to watch this event together. among many events we are pleased to be joined by students from the laguna middle-school, boys and girls club have a greater scottsdale tribes like the muscogee creek nation, confederate tribes in the tele, reservation and hosting tribal parties brought this is by many areas of the country have also pleased to be joined by the college of the nomination, the american indian college fund. these are just a smal
is not going to help us. as far as the rent and we found this location that indian restaurant or whatever, pizza place they had, basically there was -- if you go in the morning, i would like one of the commissioners to drive by there. there is a lot of people standing in front of the building. it's not safe. and they are not doing anything, just standing around in front of the window. and just standing there. and domino's pizza, they have regulation to clean up the place. sweep streets, water the plants or whatever it is. that is part of the deal. so we would rather be there, clean up the neighborhood and at least create some sort of being friendly with the neighborhood and not allow the people to hang around there. if you notice next to the park, next to the mcdonald's, there is a park there. and most of the people sit over there when the sunny days they come in front of the store and they are standing there. so we would like to see if you can approve this project so we don't have to relocate too far [stkpr-euft/]ing existing location. >> thank you very much. >> let's open up for
. there is an indian restaurant or pizza place close to ours. they were willing to -- the location is not the greatest. the decided to discuss it with us. they're willing to release the lease and lease it to us. that is basically what we are looking for in the long run. at this time we have nothing else to say except wait for a second when to go through and see what is going to happen on the other fillmore street project which is much more desirable for us to take over than geary street. this is a strange case. we had no other choices. that's it. >>: thank you. >> commissioner wu: let's open it up for public comment. david wilcox. >>: -- 30-day termination notice, completely surprised. we scrambled, found the site on geary boulevard, 3015. not perfect. and then after further -- but that was easy. and then upon further examination i talked to bruno's pizza, i thought he might be available he decided not. i found an indian restaurant. we reached a price, i agreed with them. supervisor london breed had some opposition. other than that we would like to move to fillmore, only 175 ft. from where we are,
with a group. it's a story from the [inaudible] and so the indian epiics actually the indian epiics for very common in cambodia and bali and thailand and there is a different aesthetic. all southeast asia and asia there are a lot of similarities. >> he is a male entity. he is not -- are you referring to the story? >> it's interesting you should say that. a unique indian concept is one of half male, half female. and that is -- unlike some dances the solo dancer portrays all of the parts in the story. you can portray a feminine aspect and then masculine aspect with the bow and arrow. the male has to portray feminine and the female has to portray masculine. there is a very fierce dance and a soft sort of dance and every dancer has to learn all those aspects. it's very, you know, my teacher i call him a guru in this art form you have to study very, very hard. you have to learn about all the cultural aspects. he says it's liberating because he enjoys and has to learn to bring up the feminine aspect. he's a strong character it's a challenge for him and he likes it. the stories are metaphor cal.
. for urban american indians we have powwow which are intertribal events that revolve around a shared repertoire of songs and dances like some of the singing you have heard me do here today. it's a time for people to be able to come together, not for the casinos, not for that part. talk about fighting stereotypes, that's a stereotype for us. yes, we have casinos, but that all of our culture? no. it's not all we are here to be defined by. for most people, especially in urban areas, powwows are places to go to reconnect. powwows are places you go to see people you haven't seen in a long time and to make new friends, new connections, nothing different than what's going on here, nothing difrplt than what was going on at the old festival at ft. mason. with that, i wanted to play also for you a little bit of cedar flute. if you've heard cedar flute you've heard youngblood and cedar flute has become emblematic of american indian in the singular, american indian culture. i wanted to play it for you to give you an example of what might be considered traditional style because after this i'd lak
-american war, in the civil war and the indian war. this was a guy who intersected with big history but in an intimate way. so i decided to devote a book and about four or five years of my life to trying to figure out who this guy was, kit carson. carson came out here in a way to escape america. he was a runway and he had heard all the stories about the wild west and wanted to be one of these mountain men, one of these for trappers. he did come out to mexico and intersected with these guys. he became an intimate part of their world which was mainly a french-based culture. he learned french and became fluent in french and lived with these guys and learn the river systems of the west. basically hunting pelts. of course he knew all the rivers because that was the key to understanding the topography and understanding havoc around here. when the u.s. topographical course sent an expedition under john c. fremont to explore the west they needed a guide and fremont realize that these mountain men knew the west better than anyone so he hired kit carson as a guide. carson acquitted himself hi
. archaeologists agree santa fe was habitated by pueblo indians dating back to the year 1050. >> and my name is ricardo cate. an an are cyst for -- cartoonist for the newspaper, and a collection of my work was published on august 1st under the same name, without reservation. here's a cartoon page. and when i first started my cartoons were down here. when we first started. but because of the popularity, my cartoons have jumped up here to the top upper left-hand corner. i'm from santo domingo, new mexico. one of the 19 pueblos here in new mexico, and all the pueblos are situated along the rio grande or long river here in new mexico. my cartoons depict native humor, and at first when i first started this cartoon, they were native characters in native situations, and my audience was geared towards natives. but in the last four or five years, i've -- they've become more universal, where they spilled out into the mainstream part of dominant culture. so it's more universal now. my inspiration came from reading "mad magazine" in the '7s. my friend david and i used to exchange comic books, spider man
established his own picnic rituals, enthusiastically singing old indian army toast and calling for verses that could only be separated by picnics. much has been said about churchill and alcohol, some other true, most not, some exaggerated. i go into detail about churchill's trinket habits. churchill had been told -- roosevelt had mental churchill was a job come to church one or two critics repeated. churchill did consume more alcohol than we are used to today, but not a great deal bystanders of his contemporaries and drink did not affect him or his work. churchill drank a small amount of whiskey with soda, no ice in a class about this big. his staff, not flash. at lunch and dinner he drank half a bottle of champagne. that's a different size in half bottles we know, smaller than ours today. so if they bring to your. let's talk about champagne, churchill's favorite drink. we are not sure when they first discovered champagne, but he prefers that champagne to all the others. his favorite vintage with a 1928 on each of his birth days, sent in a case of the 1928 intel supplies ran out in 1953.
first sold its first barroso to the indians in mumbai. this is exactly the kind of experience the prime minister wants to see replicated across india. small british companies coming here and selling to india, expanding. >> to the people he promised easier access to britain with a one day fast track and no limits on student numbers, which has -- which have fallen. >> net immigration has fallen by 1/4 under our government. >> we want to see indian university students. >> you say you want a special relationship with india, but does india want a special relationship with india? >> half of the investment from europe goes to britain, and we are the largest investor in britain -- in india. >> he says he wants britain to have a great partnership with india in the 21st century. with delhi delaying british helicopter deals, it is a relationship that still needs some work. >> i am joined now by the chief executive of the premier league. welcome, this is a cricket match country. what are you doing here? >> football is the fastest- growing sport in india. they are really starting to take at on and t
. the leahy-crapo vawa reauthorization bill builds on the protections for indian women by recognizing tribe's authority to prosecute nonindians who commit domestic violence against their indian spouses or dating partners. let me say this was narrowly tailored for these acts of domestic violence with specific requirements. the grassley proposal, unfortunately, does not provide the tribes the authority to enforce laws against domestic violence on their own lands. it also takes money away he from other justice department grant programs to install judges and prosecutors on tribal lands. bringing in large numbers of federal officials goes against the local solutions to domestic violence that vawa successfully promoted. federal judges and prosecutors already, as i pointed out, have authority to handle cases on tribal lands. and this has not stemmed the plague of violence against indian women. that is why -- that's what you do with reauthorizations. that why you don't have bills go ongoing forever. you have reauthorizations to try to address what are some issues that can make things better. here w
their new technologies and for the indian government it's an opportunity to show off the rising strength of its armed forces. the air show kicked off wednesday. >> there's a lot of potential and needs of the the industry. >> much of india's naval and air force hardware dates back to the soviet era. >> we beliefn collaboration and with sfwer nationinternatio working together to make this country strong. >> new delhi has budgeted through march. observers say there's a risk that india's military expansion may alarm neighboring countries such as china and pakistan. >>> a woman in india is trying to use a traditional dance to bring people of different backgrounds together. she's started practicing this ancient art after she moved from india to japan. >> the dance is characterized by graceful movement. another feature is the postures. the dancers are said to look like moving statues. she has been dancing for 16 years in india. ever since she watched the dance on video during her college da. after graduation, she moved to india. >> the angle of the neck, the movement of the joints and torso, th
, the annual state of the indian nation speech. then, a senate hearing on financial regulations. ."ter that, "q&a [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> on thursday, the national congress of american india'ns gave his annual state of in the nation address. this is an hour and 15 minutes. >> good morning. i am jacqueline pata, the executive director of the national congress of american indians, the oldest and largest native american advocacy organization representing indian country and alaska natives and their broad interests of tribal governments and their communities. i am also pleased to welcome our distinguished guests here in washington d.c. and those listening around the country to the 2013 state of the indian nations. across the country, students, teachers, and tribal citizens and leaders, businesses have gathered to watch this event together. among the many events, we're please to be joined by students from the laguna middle school, the mandaree high school, the boys and girls club of the greater scottsdale, and
of representatives so that we can get it enacted and soon. let's not undercut the provisions to help protect indian women, native american women from the serious problems they face. and in anyone needs a reminder how important government help can be, just think of the way the federal and local law enforcement worked together earlier this week to rescue ethan, a 5-year-old kidnapped boy from an underground bunker in alabama where he had been held hostage for almost a week. that was in a rural area of alabama. mr. president, any of the members who have served in law enforcement know in matters like that, we have always needed both federal and state to help us, and that's what was done in in n almost textbook example of cooperation. ask the family there and the local law enforcement if they appreciated the help of the f.b.i., the defense department and so many others who contributed to the safe return of an violent victim. i say this having spent years in local law enforcement. i have great respect for the men and women that protect us every day, and when i hear senators say we should not provide fede
at the national museum of the american indian. >>> a northern virginia teenager killed in a crash by another driver allegedly texting behind the wheel. tonight we'll hear from the victim's family on the fact that virginia has passed a new stricker texting law. >>> and new details about the explosion at a subshop in fairfax county. >>> alex ovechkin getting encouragement from an unlikely source. the terps going to black burg. >>> as "news4 at 6" continues. (woman) 3 days of walking to give a break cancer survivor a lifetime-- that's definitely a fair trade. it was such a beautiful experience. (jessica lee) ♪ and it's beautiful (woman) why walk 60 miles in the boldest breast cancer event in history? because your efforts help komen serve millions of women and men facing breast cancer every year. visit the3day.org to register or to request more information today. it was 3 days of pure joy. ♪ and it's beautiful >>> washington loves its football team, but some people think the name is offensive. chris gordon is live still american indian museum, where this issue is being debated. chris? >> rep
it is all about the economy. >> just hours after two bomb attacks in the indian city killed at least 15 people, the indian government revealed it had received warnings of a general, but not specific attack over the past three days. more than 100 people were also injured as two separate bicycle bombs were detonated almost simultaneously in the city's market area. our correspondent in delhi, andrew north, says that india has been on high alert since it hanged the kashmiri separatist earlier this month. >> there were apparently some kind of warnings just two days ago. the indian home ministry saying that they received this information suggesting there could be attacks in several indian city, including hydrobad. that's get ago loft concerns, a lot of concerns whether prevented. now, what we understand was that it appeared to have all the hallmarks of a coordinated attack. two bombs set off in close succession, clearly designed to cause maximum casualties. now, the moment officials have not suggested who they believe could be responsible, but there's speculation that it may be linked to the
and japanese sea rescue flying boats also attended the event. >> there is heavy competition because the indian acquisition budget is large. we think our history and our performance speaks for itself, and we hope to be successful. >> i think, you know, india specifically is looking long term objectively where they want to be, 5, 10, 20 years from now. being an influence and regional power if you like for their aor, area of responsibility, and also be a global. >> reporter: russia is trying to protect and strengthen its longstanding partnership with india. they have been developing a new fighter jet. >> very stable, time-tested position. indian military know us better than any other one. >> reporter: india's security agenda dominated by territorial disputes with pakistan and china. china has become a rising concern in recent years. last september, china announced deployment of its first aircraft carrier. the country is also financing port facilities in pakistan, myanmar and sri lanka, effectively extending chinese influence throughout the indian ocean. last month, beijing received custodial righ
returned the body of the pakistan soldier. the indian army says he was shot during a gunbattle with its troops on indian soil. the pakistan military says this soldier at still be crossed the line of control. -- accidentally crossed the line of control. at least four people have died during more unrest in bangladesh over war crimes tribunal. supporters of the islamic party clashed with police. they say a life sentence given to one of their leaders was politically motivated. they have been -- there have been larger demonstrations in support of the trial. >> the seaside town, the scene of the latest confrontation between police and supporters of the largest islamic party. several people were killed after it -- officers said they opened fire on the protesters after they were shot at. they do appear to show that the crisis surrounding the controversial war crimes tribunal is far from over. these people say all life term handed out on february 5 was too harsh. the charges are politically motivated. in the capital, and other big protest was held to declare the sentence was too lenient. these b
, he's in trouble if this is indian territory." underpinning all this stuff is the idea that this is a very romantic view of nature. and there's always that kind of elegiac quality in westerns. the idea that the land endures. and all these antics of humans sort of come and go. that's why the main characters of great westerns are often the landscapes. i mean the monument valley's been the hero of more than one. for americans it's like the great pyramids of egypt in the sense that there are these monumental natural forms that are much bigger than anything we can create. and that experience is kind of a vertical experience. you look up to the sky and you feel the big space and the openness of it and that's good for the soul. (thomas mcguane) the story's always the "moving on" story. what do you need to know about the western? it's about moving on. and the trouble is, even though the world is round, it's not a permanently solvable dramatic theme in that if you move on in the climate we now live in, in the western, you hit l.a., where westerns are made. (narrator) the cowboy
if this is indian territory." underpinning all this stuff is the idea that this is a very romantic view of nature. and there's always that kind of elegiac quality in westerns. the idea that the land endures. and all these antics of humans sort of come and go. that's why the main characters of great westerns are often the landscapes. i mean the monument valley's been the hero of more than one. for americans it's like the great pyramids of egypt in the sense that there are these monumental natural forms that are much bigger than anything we can create. and that experience is kind of a vertical experience. you look up to the sky and you feel the big space and the openness of it and that's good for the soul. (thomas mcguane) the story's always the "moving on" story. what do you need to know about the western? it's about moving on. and the trouble is, even though the world is round, it's not a permanently solvable dramatic theme in that if you move on in the climate we now live in, in the western, you hit l.a., where westerns are made. (narrator) the cowboy hero was invented by writers, many of whom h
dead in the indian city of a. hyderabad there were defined out who is behind the bombing. welcome to al-jazeera live from doha. will he be granted bail? olympia and oscar fdot pistorious should find out in the next few hours. we're live. -- oscar sprinter pistorious should find out. maliki.ther a rock or they want to get rid of their prime minister. >> go like this. >> thune for fog. why this scandal may help people improve their eating habits. >> the indian government is calling for unity after a bomb attack in hyderabad. that thefurious government may have not prevented the carnage. they're sifting through the carnage were 16 people were killed. the bombs went off, the park. more than of 100 wounded. indian media are reporting there were warnings of an attack three days before the blasts. security cameras have been disconnected four days ago. earlier, they said that there was no specific information that act upon. and we havederabad this report. >> this is the side of the first blast that occurred 7:00 thursday evening. the front of these shops absolutely destroyed. this is a popular
in indian homes, schools, and care homes. says the authorities are failing to protect children from both sexual abuse and -- it says the authorities are failing to protect children from both sexual abuse and how abuse is reported. the indian government has made no public comment about the report's findings. it does not respond to such reports as a matter of policy. let's go live now to delhi. we will talk to the south asia director of human rights watch. thank you for being with us. this is so shocking. i'm not really sure where to start. i spotted this figure -- 53% of those perioople who responded to this survey said they had been the victims of sex abuse. can that be right? >> the survey was conducted by the ministry of child welfare. it was in 2007. you are encouraging the government -- we are encouraging the government to look at it more deeply because the sample was quite small. it is a serious problem and one that remains largely hidden. >> when you say it remains largely hidden -- i think people around the world will find that so difficult. there appears to be this culture of sil
indians? we will introduce you. >> can't wait. the capital one cashgives you 1% cash b, plus a 50% annual bonus. and everyone but her likes 50% more cash, but i have an idea. do you want a princess dress? yes. cupcakes? yes. do you want an etch-a-sketch? yes! do you want 50% more cash? no. you got talent. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase plus a 50% annual bonus on the cash you earn. it's the card for people who like more cash. what's in your wallet? i usually say that. to help protect your eye health as you age... would you take it? well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's called ocuvite. a vitamin totally dedicated to your eyes, from the eye care experts at bausch + lomb. as you age, eyes can lose vital nutrients. ocuvite helps replenish key eye nutrients. ocuvite has a unique formula not found in your multivitamin to help protect your eye health. now that's a pill worth taking. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. help protect your eye health. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. living with moderate to semeans living with pain.is it could also
have non-native splaying, indians. and so, we don't have a lot of voices, so this cartoon is one of the few voices we have. my cartoon is able to be read, first that it's funny and at the same time, i just want people to note that we are still here and although we have suffered a great deal, each one of the tribes in its own way has suffered the same as mine, but i'm hoping that people realize that a lot of the wrongs that were done to natives are still -- it's still a tear. i just wanted to be able to pity she's back on the table and just to remind people that this land came at a price and it's not taken for granted. but as the people who come at the same time as the people we should move on any humorous way to do that. old people who read my cartoons for the first time, i hope they take with them the appreciation of the native culture and native way of life, even though they may not agree with cartoons reviews, i hope they can appreciate it because it's coming from a real person who's grown up on the reservation and has seen the dominant closer and lived at the dominant culture
. and the crime has unleashed a wave of protests over the treatment of women in indian society. holly williams is in dehli. >> reporter: badri nath singh is grieving for his daughter. she was a college student, just 23 years old, when she died after being viciously gang- raped. police say her ordeal began when she boarded a bus with her boyfriend at night. the small group of men on board seemed to have planned their attack. the pair were beaten. the young woman was gang-raped and violated with an iron rod, and then both of them were thrown from the moving bus naked and bleeding. "my love for my daughter was as deep as the ocean," he told us. "i want the men who did this to her to be hanged." mr. singh works a double shift as an airport baggage handler to buy a home in this poor neighborhood and to educate his children. now, his wife asha sits alone in a darkened room. since her daughter's death two months ago, she hasn't left the house. the crime sparked an outpouring of rage. thousands of protesters have taken to the streets, angry over what they say is an epidemic of harassment and violence
'll be voting soon, but i would join chairwoman cantwell, the chair of the senate committee on indian affairs, and the senior senator from alaska, senator murkowski, in opposing nor coburn's amendment. the amendment will remove essential protections for native women from the bill. a jurisdictional gap allows many non-indian perpetrators on tribal land to go unpunished. the problem is real. nearly half of indian women are married to non-indian men and thousands more are in relationships with non-indians. federal and state officials are not in a position to prosecute in most cases. they are often hours away. they lack the resources and local contacts to be able to effectively respond. these non-indian men can essentially abuse indian women with immunity from any other consequences. and that really has to end. these are essential tools in combatting domestic violence. senator coburn's amendment would eliminate these crucial provisions. it would reverse the significant progress we made last year when the senate passed these provisions with strong bipartisan support. but worse, it sends the messag
, and there's groups of cockney, and there are groups of irish and their brogues, and there are indian, american indian groups, and there are all these other groups, people speaking german, and he's wandering through these fields, and the campfires are burping. and webster says -- are burning. and webster says we're going to have to create our own american language. and so he's right from the beginning he's very adept at picking up words from -- indian words like creek instead of brook which is the kind of thing that the british are very upset about, the idea that you were taking -- raccoon was one of the first ones, john smith introduces the word raccoon, it was an algonquin indian word which means he who washes his face with his hands. and they would pick up words like sleigh and coleslaw from the dutch and cafeteria and hacienda from the spanish. and, again, this was seen as acts of defiance, and it was very clear right through, you know, madison comes up with his own -- i mean, madison, maybe the greatest word madison came up with, squatter, which came out of his head. he needed a
a passport to the indians. by the way, i don't like the word "minority." how about emerging majority. >> dana: they had broader culture and this was broken on the o'reilly factor. was it good use of taxpayers dollars? >> absolutely not. they have a railroad of doing this at the usda. they spent $2 22,000,000 of mony making oil portrait of him. they had $1 million on internship program and hired one intern. great intern. did a lot of work. but what i don't understand is the left has hated pilgrims. they said pilgrims came over and raped the indians and took all the land. destroyed the environment. but now they are saying that pilgrims are illegal aliens. sure you're sure the -- >> bob: you're sure the whole left is like that? this is what greg does. andrea is guilty of this, too. it's certain people do that. that is a good idea? no, i do not. west of taxpayer money. do i think that the people who came in to force indians off their land and murdered them? >> were you coming over on the may flouer? >> my family came over in chains as enemy of the state. >> dana: then they were part of apartheid
training. listen. >> pilgrims are illegal aliens. say the pilgrims never gave a passport to the indians. by the way, i don't like the word "minority." how about emerging majority. >> dana: they had broader culture and this was broken on the o'reilly factor. was it good use of taxpayers dollars? >> absolutely not. they have a railroad of doing this at the usda. they spent $2 22,000,000 of mony making oil portrait of him. they had $1 million on internship program and hired one intern. great intern. did a lot of work. but what i don't understand is the left has hated pilgrims. they said pilgrims came over and raped the indians and took all the land. destroyed the environment. but now they are saying that pilgrims are illegal aliens. sure you're sure the -- >> bob: you're sure the whole left is like that? this is what greg does. andrea is guilty of this, too. it's certain people do that. that is a good idea? no, i do not. west of taxpayer money. do i think that the people who came in to force indians off their land and murdered them? >> were you coming over on the may flouer? >> my family c
at the smithsonian american indian museum. matt ackland is live with the latest. i heard it got heated at times. >> reporter: the issue began to picture up steam recently when mayor gray mentioned if the redskins were to move back to the district, there would need to be a discussion about the redskins name and that would need to be changeed and many people here today say this name is deeply offensive. in this area, the redskins team is loved by many, a fan transcriptiony this year as the team made it to the play-off. and as for most cheer for victories on the field, others say the team's name is a loser. >> i believe that they can choose another name that would be respectful. and would still represent a great team. >> reporter: a special discussion about the teams and mascots was held at the american indian museum and a seen out front compares aninnian sports mascot to a black face character. considered racially offensive to african-americans. >> if you're watchful and go through some of the watching redskins football guys and sock about -- games and look into their box, obviously, you will fi
to say the pilgrims were illegal aliens. say, the pilgrims never gave their passport to the indians. by then way, i don't like the word, minority. how about emerging majority? [ laughter ] all right. easy, easy, easy. down, down. >> tom vilsack released a memo push ago, quote, new era of civil rights and broader culture of transformation. this was broken on "the o'reilly factor" last night. you think that was a good use of taxpayer dollars? >> absolutely not. they have a record of doing this at the usda. they spent $22,000 of taxpayer money making an oil portrait of vilsack and spent a million dollars on an internship program, hired one intern. so it's -- >> super intern. >> did he a lot of work. what i don't understand is the left has always hated pilgrims. they always said they came overd raped the indians and took all the land. and destroyed the environment.. now they're saying, pilgrims ary illegal aliens. the left loves illegal aliens! >> are you sure the whole left is like that? >> i don't get it. >> the whole y left? this is what greg does when he sits here. it is certai on p
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